Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs for Criminal Division


Criminal Division staff is available to check the case number or perform a name check in the computer to determine court dates.
A customer can expect a bond refund within 4 to 6 weeks of the final disposition. The Criminal Division will prepare the bond refund documents, which is then forwarded to the Accounting Department to be audited and processed.
Criminal Division staff is available to check the case number or perform a name check in the computer to determine the bond amount.
In order to have a record expunged or sealed, the applicant must complete the appropriate forms which can be obtained from any of our Clerk’s Office locations. If your case was a Chicago arrest, you can file in either of the following locations. If your case was a suburban arrest, you must file in the suburban district with the jurisdictions of that suburb.
With the appropriate case number or defendant’s name this information can be obtained by the Criminal Division staff or by following our phone prompts. There are also self-service kiosks located on the 1st Floor lobby of the Criminal Division. Please be advised that an information booth is available for further assistance, if required.
Documents can be filed at our front counter in our 5th Floor office. Ceiling signs denote the services performed at each counter.  Staff is available for further assistance.
The statutes allow defendants charged with certain types of offenses to post bond in a local police station without a court appearance.  Other defendants must appear before a judge for a bond hearing.  For defendants incarcerated in the Cook County Jail, bond may be posted in the  Bond Room located in Division V of the Jail.
CRIME VICTIM’S RIGHTS
 
   (a) Crime victims, as defined by law, shall have the following rights as provided by law:

      (1) The right to be treated with fairness and respect for their dignity and privacy throughout the criminal justice process.

      (2) The right to notification of court proceedings.

      (3) The right to communicate with the prosecution.

      (4) The right to make a statement to the court at sentencing.

      (5) The right to information about the conviction, sentence, imprisonment, and release of the accused.

      (6) The right to timely disposition of the case following the arrest of the accused.

      (7) The right to be reasonably protected from the accused throughout the criminal justice process.

      (8) The right to be present at the trial and all other court proceedings on the same basis as the accused, unless the victim is to testify and the court determines that the victim's testimony would be materially affected if the victim hears other testimony at the trial.

      (9) The right to have present at all court proceedings, subject to the rules of evidence, an advocate or other support person of the victim's choice.

      (10) The right to restitution.

   (b) The General Assembly may provide by law for the enforcement of this Section.

   (c) The General Assembly may provide for an assessment against convicted defendants to pay for crime victims' rights.

   (d) Nothing in this Section or in any law enacted under this Section shall be construed as creating a basis for vacating a conviction or a ground for appellate relief in any criminal case.
 
Illinois Constitution, Article I, Section 8.1.